Journalist’s Trade

“Courses that are designed to inspire journalists or encourage creative approaches to the craft are more likely to be exercises in frustration if, at the end of the training, they return to underresourced newsrooms running on skeleton budgets,” writes Sue Valentine, who directs The Media Programme at the Open Society Foundation in Cape Town, South Africa. With her cautionary words, Nieman Reports opens its series of stories that portray the experiences of many Nieman Fellows (and a few others) who have trained journalists in countries other than their own. These journalists also convey what they’ve learned in doing this.

Journalist’s Trade
Training Journalists in Foreign Countries
Introduction
By Melissa Ludtke, Editor
When Journalism Training Isn’t Enough (1 comment)
‘… our newsrooms are impoverished, and it will take much more than training courses to correct the situation.’
By Sue Valentine
Press Silence Before Rwanda’s Genocide (1 comment)
‘If any of my students reacted against the government’s methods of control, they feared for their lives.’
By Jacques A. Rivard
Training Iraqi Translators How to Act as Reporters
With concerns about safety, ‘our interpreters became something much more than translators.’
By Patrick J. McDonnell
A Challenging Experience in Cape Verde (1 comment)
‘There are journalists who justify their apathy with the lack of [good working] conditions.’
By Rui Araujo
Helping Armenian Reporters Dig Deeper (1 comment)
More in-depth and better-documented stories began to be told after an intensive training program.
By Lucinda Fleeson
Advice and Guidance for International Journalism Trainers
‘Until overseas trainers get to know the interests of the particular individuals with whom they’ll work, they are unlikely to be able to specify terms of success.’
By John Bare
Trainers Can Remain Foreign to Local Journalists
Due to cultural and language differences, trainers can be ‘regarded as a sort of extraterrestrial as they deliver their advice and lessons.’
By Ragip Duran
Lessons in Teaching Foreign Journalists
‘Issues of press freedom and independence … burn into your consciousness and touch your heart.’
By Jerome Aumente
Strategies for Training International Journalists (1 comment)
By Jerome Aumente
Support for International Journalism Training (12 comments)
By Jerome Aumente
When Bureaucracy Trumps Excellence (1 comment)
In Eastern Europe, journalists struggle to find their footing.
By Valerie Hyman
Tips for American Trainers
By Valerie Hyman
Journalism Education That Succeeds
Students at Tbilisi’s Caucasus School learn by immersing themselves in the skills and work of journalism.
By Karl Idsvoog
Getting Ukrainian Journalists to Ask Ordinary People Questions
‘We wanted to get them to report beyond press releases and false assurances of the politicians and bureaucrats.’
By Peggy Simpson
Debating How and Why Journalists Do What They Do
‘After listening to the real-life stories of real-life Polish journalists, I wasn’t so dogmatic or judgmental.’
By Kevin Cullen
Press Freedom in Ropczycka, Poland
An American journalist observes the opening months of a newspaper’s birth.
By Watson Sims
It’s Tough to Find New Footholds in Journalism
‘My experience speaks to the barriers that prevent the free trade of journalistic talent.’
By George Abraham
Respecting Cultural Traditions in a Newsroom
At the Lakota Times, editors help reporters blend their language and ceremonies into their work.
By Tim Giago
New Tools in Telling News Stories
In online workshops, Spanish-speaking journalists learn how to convey news in its broader reality.
By Daniel Ulanovsky Sack
Planting the Roots of Public Radio In Chile (1 comment)
‘Teaching public radio in a place where people didn’t know anything about it was a huge challenge ….’
By Doug Mitchell
Teaching Journalism, Finding a Home
A big challenge was balancing ‘my strong sense of ethical practice with a desire to avoid preaching an “American way”….’
By Michele McLellan
Sharing Techniques of Publishing
In Jakarta, an admirable venture was in need of organizational training.
By Ralph Hancox